White Paper

How to Avoid Cloud Vendor Lock-in with Four Best Practices

Best practices to avoid cloud vendor lock-in and gain control over your IT infrastructure

Many organizations have adopted hybrid and multi-cloud strategies to manage the recent explosion of data, gain flexibility, reduce costs, and increase capacities. But with mainframes still managing many companies’ mission-critical workload, cloud migration is often a multi-year strategy with moving targets.

Accelerating paces of digital business and technology innovations have created massive amounts of data that require continual integration. Ninety percent of the world’s data has been created in the past two years. Examples of new data include cloud, mobile, social media, and IoT data. With diverse formats, sources, and locations, these data have created many challenges. Many organizations have adopted hybrid and multi-cloud strategies to manage data proliferation, gain flexibility, reduce costs, and increase capacities. The cloud storage and data warehouses—such as Azure, Google, Amazon Web Services (AWS), and Snowflake—particularly have gained enterprise acceptance.

Meanwhile, organizations still need to maintain and integrate their mainframes and other on-premises systems. It may surprise many people that 71% of Fortune 500 companies are still using the mainframe to manage their mission-critical workload, and 92 of the world’s top 100 banks continue to use the mainframe. Many mainframe systems contain master data or systems of records, so the mainframe is not going away anytime soon. Consequently, cloud migration often is a multi-year strategy with moving targets.

However, the adoption of hybrid and multi-cloud without an independent integration layer can lock organizations to cloud vendors and create brittle point-to-point integration. For example, when various lines-of- business (LOBs) within an organization are directly integrating diverse data sources/targets using different integration utilities, each LOB would develop their own logics on data access, mapping, transformation, loading, and management. Data governance is often an after-thought. The end-result is the classic dreaded point-to-point integration, which results in redundant work, increased cost, higher complexity, and deteriorated quality assurance. Moreover, point-to-point integration is a fertile ground for security and governance breaches because of the lack of the coherent supervision.

Having a strategy without an independent integration layer can lock organizations to cloud vendors and create brittle point-to-point integration. This results in redundant work, increased cost, higher complexity, and deteriorated quality assurance.

Download this new white paper to explore the four best practices your organization can adopt to avoid cloud vendor lock-in and gain control over your IT infrastructure.

How to avoid cloud vendor lock